REVIEW: Windows Phone 7 – WP7 is sexy, but is it good enough to compete?

windows-phone-7-wp7-review

Windows Phone 7 is the latest mobile operating system to hit the scene and it’s hands-down the sexiest smartphone OS out there. WP7 is completely new. The UI is unlike anything you’ve seen elsewhere. Tile animations and transitions are smooth as silk. It’s obvious that Microsoft decided to put an emphasis on the design and eye-appeal of WP7, giving the operating system the kind of design aesthetic that you see in the glossy pages of high-concept magazines or in the halls of design/art schools.

But, does Windows Phone 7’s slick animations, crisp text, and refined style leave room for a high-end operating system that’s capable of going toe-to-toe with the best of what Google and Apple have to offer? Let’s take a look at Windows Phone 7’s features and break down the pros and cons.

What better place to begin than the beginning?

The Good

  • Responsive UI
  • Crisp text and graphics (almost like e-Ink)
  • Seamless Facebook integration
  • Quick-start camera for capturing fleeting moments
  • Uncluttered interface
  • Sexy design aesthetic that invokes a high-concept magazine
  • Easy Google, Facebook, Windows Live setup
  • Did we mention the snazzy, new, eye-candy UI?

The Bad

  • Doesn’t support external storage
  • Lack of cut/paste functionality (coming in early 2011)
  • No WiFi Mobile Hotspot feature
  • Lack of Twitter integration (coming soon)
  • Finnicky Google integration
  • No unified inbox or threaded email
  • Many apps don’t persist in the background
  • Most of the OS is optimized for portrait view (landscape orientation isn’t as ubiquitous as we’d like)

Navigation

There are only three navigation keys that you need to be familiar with. Microsoft has mandated that handset makers must adhere to a strict handset design spec that requires a standardized, three-key layout. You have the “back” key on the left, which navigates, well, backwards. The middle key is the “Start” key, which is similar to the “Home” button on Android and iPhone. The Start key takes you back to you Start Screen (more on that later) and it’s the central point from which you navigate throughout WP7. The right key the “search” key, and it fires up the integrated Bing search app. From this app you can search the web for websites, local businesses, and any news stories that match your search terms.

Lockscreen

When you turn the display on, you’re greeted by the lockscreen. You get at-a-glance information on signal strength, WiFi connectivity, Bluetooth connectivity, battery level, time, date, calendar events, and missed calls and pending messages. What’s cool is that you can fire up the camera from the lockscreen, even while the display is turned off, by holding down the dedicated camera shutter button.

You can change your lockscreen wallpaper by going to the “Settings” menu and choosing a new picture to splash up on the lockscreen. You can also setup a lockscreen password for added security.

The best part of the lockscreen is that you can see your pending messages and upcoming calendar events without having to fire up the email or calendar apps. Just turn the screen on and get quick access to your most important information.

Start screen / Homescreen

Slide your finger upwards from the lockscreen and you’re taken to your “Start” screen. This is a completely new homescreen design for Windows Phone 7. The WP7 Start homescreen serves up a variety of “tiles” that you can rearrange to suit your needs. The Start screen tiles give access to everything from basic phone functions to apps to webpages. You can “pin” WP7 apps, contacts, web pages, and even OneNote notes to this Start homescreen – the idea is to give you a single, centralized user interface that allows you to navigate the entire device in a way that minimizes the time it takes for you to dig around and find an app or a favorite photo.

Kinetic scrolling and responsive touch controls are the name of the game here. All windows have kinetic scrolling enabled – allowing you to quickly scroll through a list with a flick of a finger, using the momentum of your flick to scroll through the list. When you reach the end of a list, the icons/tiles/text that you’re scrolling through will “smoosh” up and bounce back, rather than abruptly stopping at the end of the list. It’s a subtle touch that goes a long way in giving the WP7 UI a really refined, high-concept feel.

The topmost four tiles are always set to Phone, People, Messaging, and Email tiles. The next group of four tiles are customized by the handset maker and/or wireless carrier that sold you your WP7 phone. You can rearrange tiles by tapping and holding on a tile and then moving it to the desired location on the homescreen. Tiles do not automatically clean themselves up, which can get a little irritating at times.

Apps / Hubs

The Windows Phone 7 apps that are included with the phone are slim. You get “apps” for basic features, such as camera, phone, calendar, email, Twitter, contacts, text messages, and the like. Beyond that, you’ll need to hit up the Marketplace for more apps. By the time the device launches in stores, you should be greeted by no less than 1,000 apps in Marketplace, with hundreds more apps coming online weekly.

You’ll also see “hubs” as part of the Start screen. Hubs look like most other tiles, but open up in panoramic screens that serve up all kinds of relevant content. The Games hub, for example, aggregates all the Windows Phone 7 games that you download from Marketplace. You can also customize and fiddle with your Xbox Live avatar. The Games hub will even notify you when a friend wants to challenge you to a game or when it’s your turn in an ongoing, turn-based game.

We’d like to see more apps running in the background. Most apps, as of the time of this review, were not built to take advantage of WP7’s APIs which allow them to continue to persist in the background (multitask). Both the iPhone (iOS) and Android phones are capable of running apps in the background (for the most part), so it’s clear that Microsoft has some catching up to do with Windows Phone 7.

Voice Recognition

Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for a nearby restaurant on your WP7 smartphone. Well, with the voice recognition feature, you can do that with just a few words. From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the Microsoft TellMe speech features in Windows Phone 7. This will let you use your voice to call people, start apps, and search the web. You might want to “Call Steve Ballmer, mobile.” Or maybe you want to “Open Calendar.” If you’re feeling adventurous you can “Find movie theaters” and Bing will do all the legwork for you. Not sure what to say? Just ask the phone, “What can I say?”

The voice recognition service is based on the TellMe technology that Microsoft acquired not too long ago. It works well, but isn’t yet up to par with Google’s voice recognition services. It’s about on par with the iOS voice command feature, which is actually not that bad.

Live Tiles

Some of the tiles on your Start screen are known as “Live Tiles.” They’re called that because they’re seemingly “alive” with information. Live Tiles automagically update themselves with information relevant to their function. The People tile will continue to update itself with our friends’ profile pictures, based on the most recent activity on social networks like Facebook. The Calendar tile will update itself with your next calendar event. Email tiles update themselves with the number of unread emails. And so on.

On the surface, Live Tiles might seem a bit gimmicky, but in use, they really are useful. No more digging into apps to update yourself on the most recent happenings. Live Tiles allow you to simply glance at your Start screen and get the info you need.

Marketplace

Marketplace is where you go to buy stuff in Windows Phone 7. You can access the Marketplace through one of the default tiles on your Start screen. From the store, you can browse all manner of WP7 apps, games, and even music. If you see something you like, you can buy it with a couple taps of your finger – and charge it to the credit card that you have linked to your Windows Live account.

Microsoft has assured us that, by launch in November, the Marketplace will boast over 1000 WP7 apps and will continue to add more apps and games at a rate of a hundreds per week following the initial launch. That’s not a huge number, but you can be sure that, by the time you pick up your own Windows Phone, you’ll likely have access to all the apps that you’ll need to get started with the new Microsoft OS and be happy.

You can’t buy videos in the Marketplace from your Windows Phone, which is kind of a bummer. But, remember, the iPhone didn’t launch with a full feature-set either. You can still download videos through Zune on your PC and then transfer the video to your handset via tethered or WiFi sync.

Social Networking

Facebook and Windows Live are the only social networks that are natively integrated into Windows Phone 7. Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are connected via Windows Live. Unfortunately, Twitter integration is still in development and will be rolled out through an over-the-air update.

The idea behind Windows Phone 7 is that it puts all your information within easy reach. That includes all your and your friends’ status updates, photo uploads and comments. You can find your own status updates in your Me tile on the Start screen. All your friends’ comments and status updates are available as part of the People tile. There is a Twitter app, but no matter how pretty and clean it looks, we just can’t get over the app’s sluggish performance and lack of background notifications – the app has to be open to deliver messages and tweets. We’re hoping that more apps are allowed to persist in the background with future updates.

The integration of social networks into People (contacts), Me and Pictures is impressive. It takes some getting used to — you’ll have to get used to jumping between People, Me and Pictures to get a clear picture of what’s going on in your network — but it works seamlessly with WP7.

While email doesn’t offer a unified inbox feature,WP7 offers unified contacts. If you have multiple contacts cards for the same person (say you have info in Facebook as well as Google Contacts), you can link both cards to the same contact in Windows Phone 7. That way, you can view a combination of all the information across multiple contact cards in a single view. This makes it handy to aggregate all your contacts’ information in an organized way.

Unfortunately, integration with Google contacts is still a bit lacking. Google contacts that aren’t perfectly formatted for WP7 will fail to show up – phone numbers that are listed as “other” instead of “phone” will not show up in your contacts. This can be frustrating (it was incredibly frustrating for us), but now that you’re armed with this info, you’ll hopefully be less frustrated with WP7 and Google Contacts integration.

Calendar

The Calendar could have better Google Calendar integration, but that’s just us. For the most part, calendar functions in WP7 work extremely well. And then there’s the visual appeal of a calendar set against a simple, black background. Like everywhere else in Windows Phone 7, calendar text is crisp and almost reminds us of e-Ink.

You can designate meeting attendees through the calendar, and even notify them that you’re running late to a meeting via the “running man” icon in the calendar. And, if you have a scheduling conflict, WP7 Calendar will show you the conflict and give you all your meeting details to help you decide how to resolve the conflict.

Like we mention above, Google Calendar support could be better (try sharing calendars between friends and getting them to show up in WP7 – we should note that iOS can’t do this either). Google services are best left to Android devices, for obvious reasons. Still, you can add basic calendars from Google, Windows Live and even Outlook and have them all show up seamlessly in WP7.

In the end, Windows Phone 7 gets bonus points for a visually stunning and well thought-out calendar, but takes a hit for its lack of Google Calendar support.

Pictures

The Pictures hub is where you go to browse and manage your photos. Makes sense right? Thanks to the panoramic hub, Pictures are mostly presented in an intuitive and convenient fashion. Pictures that you upload to Facebook are all automatically pulled into the Pictures hub. Even cooler, pictures that your friends upload to their Facebook accounts are also automatically pulled into the Pictures hub. This is where the seamless Facebook integration comes into play. We like it.

You can also access photos that you upload to your Windows Live account, SkyDrive, and even your profile pictures from Facebook. One thing that we had a hard time wrapping our collective heads around was the convoluted organization structure. Photos can be grouped into “Mobile photos from Windows Live” as well as “SkyDrive camera roll from Windows Live”. Microsoft is good at creating confusing organization structures, and Windows Live reinforces that fact. We’re still not sure why SkyDrive is branded separately from Windows Live. Full disclosure: we’re Mac users.

We like the fact that the camera fires up even while the screen is locked. That’s a really handy little feature that helps you capture those fleeting moments in life. Simply hold down the camera shutter button as you take the phone out of your pocket or purse and, with a little luck, the camera should be ready for action by the time you are ready to frame your shot. You can choose to have photos that you take automatically uploaded to the cloud and synced with your SkyDrive. We really like the automatic cloud syncing capabilities of WP7, even if it is still a little rough around the edges.

The Live Viewfinder also makes it easy to preview pictures that you just captured. Simply swipe your finger to the right on the camera viewfinder and you can swipe through previously captured photos with abandon. On iPhone or Android, you have to tap the “preview photo” icon to check out your past pics. That’s what WP7 is all about – easy navigation and incredible eye-appeal.

Music and Videos

Zune integration. That’s the key to the music and video experience on WP7. The idea behind the Music+Video hub is that it serves as a central hub from which you can access all your media. If you have a subscription to Microsoft’s all-you-can-eat music streaming service, Zune Pass, WP7 is the smartphone OS for you. You can stream music to your heart’s content, and all you have to do is sign in to Windows Phone with your Windows Live account.

What? You don’t have Zune Pass? Worry not, you can still transfer music (including playlists) from your computer to your Windows Phone using the Zune client/application on a PC or the Windows Phone Connector for Mac. You can also buy songs on the Zune Marketplace from either your phone or your PC (using a credit card that you link to your Windows Live account). Unfortunately Macs do not get this feature. Macs can only sync songs and photos to a Windows Phone at this point.

You can play videos through your the phone’s Zune Player app. These videos have to be transferred to from a computer. You can’t buy videos in the Marketplace using your phone. If you want to buy videos for your phone, you’ll have to buy them using your desktop and sync it to your phone.

The media player is capable of playing a variety of file types: .mp3, .m4a (aac), .wma, .mp4, .m4v, .wmv, and .jpg formats are compatible with the media player. Videos play almost instantly, with little waiting for playback to begin. The controls are simple. Simply tap on the screen to bring up playback controls (play, rewind, fast forward). Unfortunately, the lack of a scrubbing bar makes it tedious to skip to the end of a long movie. That’s a small con for WP7.

Games

Just as Zune Pass is tightly integrated into WP7, Xbox Live is also integrated into the platform. From the Games hub, you can access all sorts of online games, downloaded games, check on game requests from friends that want to play with you in an online battle of wits, and even keep tabs on your Xbox Live account. All you have to do is login to your Windows Phone with the Windows Live ID that you linked to your Xbox Live account, and you’ll have full access to your avatar, your props, and full closet access.

With a free download, you can enable all sorts of Xbox Live features on your Windows Phone. You can see what your XBL friends are doing on their phones, PC or consoles, and even message them via XBL text messages. You can also brag about your achievements to anyone on your Friends list.

The Games hub is also where all your downloaded games will automatically be stored. When you purchase a game from the Marketplace, you won’t see the game in your Apps List. The game will save itself to your Games hub, where you can go to not only play your downloaded games, but also discover new games for download. The hub will also notify you of any game requests from friends that are waiting for you to play with them or when it’s your turn to make a move.

Search

Search in Windows Phone 7 is context aware – meaning that it will search through different media depending on the task at hand. There are two levels of “search” in WP7. You can choose to search the web for content related to your search terms, or you can search within an app. Tap the hardware “Search” button from the homescreen and you can search the web for relevant websites, local businesses, and even news related to your search term. In apps with a search field, a single tap on the hardware search button will allow you to search for words in the app. A second tap on the hardware search button allows you to search the web, as you would from the homescreen.

The Bing Search tool will return search results for web hits, local businesses, and even news hits. If you search for “sushi,” Bing will show you web results for “sushi,” local businesses that serve sushi or are related to sushi in some way, and will even give you news on sushi. If you choose to dig into a local sushi-related business, Bing will serve up business ratings, phone numbers, websites, hours of operation, and even reviews and nearby businesses. That’s what we call comprehensive search.

Windows Phone 7 will also allow you to look up the definition to a word in a document. Simply tap a target word to highlight it and then tap the hardware search button. WP7  will automatically start searching the web for any results relevant to your highlighted word. It’s a small feature, but surprisingly useful for increasing your vocabulary.

Overall, search is done really well on Windows Phone 7. We’d like to be able to cut-and-paste search terms into the search box, but seeing as how the feature will hit WP7 in early 2011, we’ll give search a solid two thumbs up.

Email

Email is as good as anything that iPhone or Android can offer. You get full HTML email support, which means you can view emails with fancy-schmancy formatting and embedded images (you have to allow the email client to download images, thought – a spam consideration). Emails can be updated at regular intervals or pushed to your phone as they come in. And, emails are integrated into Live Tiles that sit on your Start screen and automatically update themselves with your inbox’s unread email count.

If you get an email with an address or phone number within, WP7 will recognize the data and highlight it for you. Clicking (tapping) on the highlighted data will automatically take you to the phone to call the number or Bing Maps to show you where the address is on a map. In early 2011, copy/paste will be rolled out to Windows Phone 7, allowing you to do whatever you want with phone numbers and addresses, but, for the time being, the email client handles this kind of data well. That is, unless the address or phone number is formatted strangely or is surrounded by various numbers – in which case, WP7 will freak out and fail to dial the correct number or pull up the correct address (this shouldn’t happen too often).

Unlike the iPhone, you can actually attach images to an email from within the email client. With iPhone, if you finish writing an email and decide that you want to attach a photo, you have to copy the text, trash your current email, go to your photo, share it via email, and then paste the text back into the email. With WP7, all you have to do is click the “attach” icon at the bottom of the screen and you can choose the picture(s) you’d like to attach.

If you need a unified inbox, WP7 isn’t going to satisfy you at the moment. There is no unified inbox. Microsoft may or may not roll out an update (we’re leaning towards “may”) down the line that enables unified inbox for the email client in Windows Phone 7, so keep that in mind. You also don’t get threaded email views, which is a big deal for us.

Email on Windows Phone 7 is good. It’s better than anything iPhone or Android had to offer in their early days, and is almost as good as anything they have to offer today. In some ways, email on WP7 is better than iPhone today. That’s saying a lot.

Maps

You don’t get turn-by-turn GPS navigation, but you do get what we believe is the most polished maps experience on any smartphone. With a fast enough data connection, maps fade into view in an organic way. Map data appears on the screen as if being uncovered by clouds, in contrast to the cold map tiles that Google Maps tends to load. This is especially evident when zooming into a portion of the map – it just feels smoother and less jarring than on iPhone or Android

You can choose from aerial or map view in Bing Maps. We prefer the Maps view, but if you like the “satellite view” look, then you’ll want to opt for aerial view. On top of the that, you can overlay traffic data on the map, showing you where the worst traffic is where you’ll find free-flowing routes.

Bing Maps is also integrated into search. Tap on a “Local” search result and you’ll be whisked away to Bing Maps, showing you exactly where a particular business or address is located. You can then tap on the address flag to get more details on the location: business ratings, phone number, website, hours of operation. Swipe left on this screen to read individual reviews on the business. Swipe left again to see what’s nearby.

Addresses embedded in emails and text messages will automatically link to Bing Maps. Most of the time, you just click on the underlined address and you’ll be taken to the maps app. Sometimes, though, if the address is surrounded by numbers or just formatted in a non-standard fashion, WP7 will fail to recognize the address correctly. This is one instance where the lack of cut-and-paste comes in to play its nasty tricks.

Bing Maps is the new gold standard for smartphone mapping. It’s lacking some features — like public transit directions and turn-by-turn GPS guidance — but it’s mostly an incredible experience.

Internet Explorer

With Windows Phone 7 in hand, you don’t have to worry about dealing with Internet Explorer web browsers of days past. We’ll avoid commenting on the desktop version of Internet Explorer, because, well, that’s just going to get us all worked up. Instead, we’ll focus on the Internet Explorer Mobile experience — some of you may know the mobile web browser as Pocket Internet Explorer (PIE) — and how it’s grown up in WP7.

Gone are the days when Internet Explorer Mobile for Windows Mobile forced you to use a stylus in order to navigate efficiently around the clunky interface. The new Internet Explorer Mobile for Windows Phone 7 is swipe-tastically optimized for touch inputs. It shares DNA with the desktop version of Internet Explorer 7 and Internet Explorer 8. It handles HTML5 without problem and serves up the same crisp, sub-pixel rendered text that makes the rest of WP7 look so good. In short, IE Mobile in WP7 is light years improved from what you may have known from the Windows Mobile days.

The browser will support tabbed browsing for up to 6 different windows at the same time. Unfortunately, we weren’t really able to browse more than a couple tabs at the same time. Loading multiple webpages concurrently can be hard on system resources, and it seemed as if WP7 had trouble keeping more than a couple tabs loaded at the same time. We sometimes had to wait for pages to reload after browsing other tabs. It’s not a huge concern, but is irritating enough to mention.

Another irritating aspect of the web browser is the the inability to pull up the URL bar when in landscape orientation. The browser works just fine and dandy in portrait view, but if you turn the phone sideways for a widescreen view, you can’t access the URL bar.

On the upside, pages will load in the background as you fire up a new tab and start browsing another website. This is a critical feature, and is one of the few instances where processes continue in the background. Windows Phone 7 doesn’t really multi-task – some apps will work in the background (like the FM Radio, Pandora, webpages loading in the browser), but most will simply close themselves down upon returning to the Start screen.

IE Mobile, in the end, is pretty much on par with the iPhone and Android web browsers. It may need a little more polish, but the current state of IE Mobile is good. Not the best, but good enough.

Is Windows Phone 7 more than just a pretty face?

Let’s start off with the obvious. Windows Phone 7 is the sexiest smartphone OS that we’ve yet seen. It’s super model sexy. It’s got that undercover hotness factor that belies the elegance and poise of its design aesthetic. Hands-down, WP7 will give iPhone and webOS a serious run for its money, as far as looks are concerned. But, does Windows Phone 7 have what it takes to be more than just a pretty face?

That answer depends on how you plan to use your smartphone. For most people, WP7 will be a fantastic alternative to iPhone and Android. You can sync all your emails (with full HTML compatibility) and let you know when you have unread email sitting in your inbox. You can browse the full web with the kind of multi-touch pinch-zooming interaction that iPhone, Android and webOS users have been enjoying for years. You get quick, easy access to information from your social networks. You can use the Microsoft Office hub to do some serious work done. You’ll enjoy a new UI that is a fresh departure from the app-based iPhone and Android UIs – flat, artsy tiles and incredibly crisp text. And, to top it all off, you get unrivaled integration with Xbox Live and your Zune Pass.

But, here’s the kicker, if you’re the kind of power user that needs apps like Twitter to continue running in the background, relies heavily on Google services (Google Calendar, Google Contacts), and can’t do without a unified inbox, WP7 may not be for you. For those of you that fall into this group, make sure you know what you’re getting yourself into.

For most people, Windows Phone 7 will be way more than a pretty face, it’s a fully competent and compelling smartphone platform. It’s good stuff, and it doesn’t hurt that the UI is fresh and new.

*note: cut-and-paste functionality will be enabled in WP7 with an update in early 2011

Make sure to check out all our Windows Phone 7 reviews and hands-on coverage:

REVIEW: AT&T HTC Surround – Does this Windows Phone 7 handset rock?
REVIEW: AT&T Samsung Focus Windows Phone – Super AMOLED and WP7

Hands-on the HTC Mozart Windows Phone 7 handset – Aluminum unibody and WP7
Hands-on with the HTC HD7 Windows Phone 7 smartphone – Big screen and WP7 goodness
Hands On with the LG Quantum with Windows Phone 7
Hands-On: LG Optimus 7 – PlayTo App Allows for Mobile Streaming
Hands-on Samsung Focus Windows Phone 7 smartphone – Super AMOLED and WP7
Hands-on: HTC Surround Windows Phone 7 handset – Dolby surround sound for WP7
Hands-on the HTC 7 Trophy Windows Phone 7 smartphone – An affordable WP7 phone

  • Jed

    With Windows Phone 7, you only get one web browser. It is based on Internet Explorer 7, with javascript taken from IE8. So you’d better like IE, ’cause on Windows Phone 7, there is no Firefox, no SkyFire, no Opera, no Webkit. Also, (contrary to what the article said), there is no HTML5 on Windows Phone 7, which will prevent you using many web apps.

    These early Windows Phone 7 handsets have too many problems to be recommended. Lack of Copy/Paste. No ability to use hidden wireless hotspots. No Bluetooth file exchange. There are many other shortcomings that will frustrate users.

    Windows Phone 7 basically is not ready. Take another look in 6 months time to see if Microsoft has fixed some of the shortcomings, though I think it will take Microsoft a couple of years to restore this functionality.

    • Anonymous

      html5? I don’t even know desktop applications who really support it. Why you need another browser if the instyalled browser works ok? You are prejudiced.

    • stoli89

      Lack of basic features as simple as customizing ringtones should be part of a smartphone OS at this stage. I think WP7 will be an excellent OS with a great UI, but it just isn’t ready. By 3Q2011…a whole new ballgame for WP7. Of course, at that point we’ll also have Meego, IOS 5, and Android 2.3 to keep us captivated. Clearly, MS had to launch now, else risk losing momentum. Still, and with all of these bugs, the money MS has poured into marketing WP7 should overcome much of the OS’ shortcomings.

    • Ucyimda_Ruler

      You sound like a one off user that enjoys features that others rarely use. Copy and paste is coming soon, hidden wireless hotspots doesn’t seem that big of a deal. At anytime I usually see 4-8 free ones. Bluetooth file exchange, really? I hardly constitute that as a problem especially if I only used it one in my life. But then again, as a I mentioned you seem like that one guy in the world that must have it.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      ? Not ready? You are picking at the small beans. Go pick one up, open your mind, and leave outside sources, outside. This comment is unneeded, You simply restated the cons, without the pros.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      ? Not ready? You are picking at the small beans. Go pick one up, open your mind, and leave outside sources, outside. This comment is unneeded, You simply restated the cons, without the pros.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      ? Not ready? You are picking at the small beans. Go pick one up, open your mind, and leave outside sources, outside. This comment is unneeded, You simply restated the cons, without the pros.

  • Anonymous

    Apple/Android fanboy alert.

  • Anonymous

    Apple/Android fanboy alert.

    • http://www.webarnes.ca/ Billy Barnes

      “Apple/Android fanboy”?

    • Anonymous

      Microsoft/Apple/Android/Symbian/BlackBerry/WebOS fanboy alert. Oh, and MeeGo too. Have to cover all the fanboy bases.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      He made a good point. Go up and call the one stating all the cons, and calling it a piece of junk a fanboy.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      He made a good point. Go up and call the one stating all the cons, and calling it a piece of junk a fanboy.

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      He made a good point. Go up and call the one stating all the cons, and calling it a piece of junk a fanboy.

  • Anonymous

    Apple/Android fanboy alert.

  • Anonymous

    Apple/Android fanboy alert.

  • Garyneiluk

    Jed,

    Just looking at “These early Windows Phone 7 handsets have too many problems to be recommended. Lack of Copy/Paste. No ability to use hidden wireless hotspots. No Bluetooth file exchange. There are many other shortcomings that will frustrate users.”

    Sounds like your descriving an iPhone when it 1st launched yet look where they are now. Looking back at Apple people went for the new and bold concept which is what Microsoft are relying on here until they start running. If you went back a few years knowing what you know now, whould you recommend an iPhone or tell people to wait ?

  • Garyneiluk

    Jed,

    Just looking at “These early Windows Phone 7 handsets have too many problems to be recommended. Lack of Copy/Paste. No ability to use hidden wireless hotspots. No Bluetooth file exchange. There are many other shortcomings that will frustrate users.”

    Sounds like your descriving an iPhone when it 1st launched yet look where they are now. Looking back at Apple people went for the new and bold concept which is what Microsoft are relying on here until they start running. If you went back a few years knowing what you know now, whould you recommend an iPhone or tell people to wait ?

    • Anonymous

      True but the difference is the iPhone at the time offered a better UX experience and App Store (a year out at least) than the competition. The smartphone landscape is much different now and iOS, Android RIM and maybe even Palm offer high-quality experiences with well built ecosystems (well, maybe not webOS).

      The real question is: does the UI and UX on Windows Phone 7 enough to overcome its lacking features? I can’t go that far yet because Android and iOS are pretty darn mature. By this time next year though, I’m sure WP7 will be kicking all sorts of bootys and taking names.

      • http://www.facebook.com/theofficialleewalton Lee Walton

        Most Applie iPhone users MISS the point of the Metro UX. It is hands down the best user experience to date on a smartphone, everything at the OS level is integrated well and doesn’t require to go to different apps for a consistent stream of work, like replying to an e-mail and attaching a phone or other attachment. The Apple has traditionally been the benefactor of people who do not understand technology, and just want to “draw” or “make music” while Microsoft focuses on people’s workstreams, and how best to augment that experience. If you have ever used a Windows Phone 7 device you would see that there is nothing missing. Simply saying, “oh, it doesn’t have apps” or “oh, no cut and paste” are illegitimate gripes if you haven’t experience how the device actually works, and I’m a bit disappointed that the so called reviewers of the phones don’t understand this.

        • Rickyishiding

          Having no apps is an illegitimate gripe. Anyone considering this phone has to understand it’s brand new and will take time to acquire support. No copy and paste is unacceptable as it’s a pretty universal function that comes in handy no matter how elegant the counter solution might be. I love my Focus, but I’m not going to ignore the faults and praise it as a super phone. Microsoft will truly become Apple if I did that and nothing would be recognized as problematic and get fixed, they’ll just tell me I’m doing it wrong ;). Joking aside, the Metro UI is definitely streamlined and easy for me compared to the Captivate and iPhone 3g of my past, and WP7 has taken alot of notes from both Android and IOS to really make this work. This is definitely no Kin, but it doesn’t kill the looming feeling that if Microsoft does not commit themselves and listen to their userbase, it can die just as easily. That would really suck for me because I really like the direction they’re headed.

  • Garyneiluk

    Jed,

    Just looking at “These early Windows Phone 7 handsets have too many problems to be recommended. Lack of Copy/Paste. No ability to use hidden wireless hotspots. No Bluetooth file exchange. There are many other shortcomings that will frustrate users.”

    Sounds like your descriving an iPhone when it 1st launched yet look where they are now. Looking back at Apple people went for the new and bold concept which is what Microsoft are relying on here until they start running. If you went back a few years knowing what you know now, whould you recommend an iPhone or tell people to wait ?

  • Garyneiluk

    Jed,

    Just looking at “These early Windows Phone 7 handsets have too many problems to be recommended. Lack of Copy/Paste. No ability to use hidden wireless hotspots. No Bluetooth file exchange. There are many other shortcomings that will frustrate users.”

    Sounds like your descriving an iPhone when it 1st launched yet look where they are now. Looking back at Apple people went for the new and bold concept which is what Microsoft are relying on here until they start running. If you went back a few years knowing what you know now, whould you recommend an iPhone or tell people to wait ?

  • CaptnJim

    Very good unbiased review. And from a mac user too.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mj-Williams/100000096491109 Mj Williams

    Just want to make some corrections from the bad
    The Bad

    Doesn’t support external storage
    not exactly true. dell venue pro and other devices do support expandable and external storage, but the result is a hard reset sadly. That has been known since MIX in March
    Lack of cut/paste functionality (coming in early 2011)
    No WiFi hotspot feature
    That is up to the OEM to offer it. Microsoft specifically noted the devices are capable but it is up to OEM to implement the function
    Lack of Twitter integration (coming soon)
    I am not a twitter user, but what worries me is how third party programs are working. And by working, I mean there is some noticeable lag in scrolling and data aggregation from a lot of sources. That worries me
    Finnicky Google integration
    This is catch 22 you can get some good google integration without tying it to your hotmail account, but its not especially easy and most users will not go through it…
    No unified inbox or threaded email
    Threaded email is not a huge deal for me and neither is a unified inbox. I prefer to have a separate email for my different activities and I hated it on apple
    Apps don’t persist in the background
    I think this will come with program multitasking in the Jan 11 update
    Most of the OS is optimized for portrait view (landscape orientation isn’t as ubiquitous as we’d like)
    This is something I was afraid of since the emulator days. Does it work well in landscape? And sadly it looks like a no…which may cements my need for a dell venue pro

  • Jake Rider

    Hey kid – He just said the built in browser doesn’t work correctly because it doesn’t support HTML5. And “desktop applications” that support it? Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, IE Desktop, etc ALL support it. Also, don’t call people prejudiced if you can’t even spell “installed” correctly.

  • Jake Rider

    Hey kid – He just said the built in browser doesn’t work correctly because it doesn’t support HTML5. And “desktop applications” that support it? Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, IE Desktop, etc ALL support it. Also, don’t call people prejudiced if you can’t even spell “installed” correctly.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YFXRLJO52BHEGKAWJXE7EN6QG4 iluvuillkillu

      Jake, are you smarter than a kid? HTML5 and Flash are coming to WP7 in 2011. BTW when iOS came out it lacked many core features as well. I am sure MS will start releasing updates.

      • StevieBallz

        Usage of HTML5 is currently in testing at best – the W3C discourages usage right now.

        Microsoft is working hard on IE9 for the Desktop and doing a pretty good job with the HTML 5 support so I guess we’ll see this wander down to the Phone when it’s done (hard to base a release browser on a beta one, isn’t it?)

        Well, the browser has not let me down on any pages so far.

        What I think is rather interesting is the part on Twitter – no it is not integrated into the system core but there are several apps to support it just fine – don’t see too much of a problem there.

        Nonetheless – the OS is visibly in it’s infancy so I won’t go out into the world saying: this is the phone to solve all your problems (but neither are Android phones or the iPhone). Let’s wait and see – but if u need a phone today take a look – most things are working just fine right now.

        • Rickyishiding

          What I’d really like to see if more live tile support from third party devs. I wouldn’t mind small print on my nice 4″ amoled telling me how tweets/mentions and retwets there are to see if it’s worth opening my app for. Hell, integrate push notifications if you need to. MS, you’ve got a lot of catching up to do, hop to it!

          • SMITHSOUTHPORT

            “Let’s start off with the obvious. Windows Phone 7 is the sexiest smartphone OS that we’ve yet seen. It’s super model sexy

            SO I CAN SLEEP WITH WP7 ,NO NEED FOR FRING ,SKYPE OR ANY MORE CHATTING PROGRAMS

  • http://www.facebook.com/antifuse Ryan Waddell

    I ended up going with a Samsung Captivate instead of WP7 – no multitasking, no tethering? That means no WP7 for me this time around.

  • Someinternetdude

    The last thing I would call Win Phone 7 is sexy, far from it. After two years in development is this what MS came up with? Anyway I give it a year before it goes the way of the KIN.

  • Someinternetdude

    The last thing I would call Win Phone 7 is sexy, far from it. After two years in development is this what MS came up with? Anyway I give it a year before it goes the way of the KIN.

  • Someinternetdude

    The last thing I would call Win Phone 7 is sexy, far from it. After two years in development is this what MS came up with? Anyway I give it a year before it goes the way of the KIN.

    • Lee Walton

      Wishful thinking. Come out from under your Apple rock and taste the sunlight!

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      Ha, pick one up and see for yourself. I had a iPhone 4 and a MS7 in both hands at the ATT store. BY FAR the MS7 is ASTOUNDING in visual aspects. BUT worthless if you don’t have fb, zune, live, etc.

      • Twiggy6x3

        The phone is great and it is not necesarly worthless if you don’t have FB, windows live or Zune pass. Those are just features and if you don’t use them, remove them and that’s it. You can still do all the other awesome things the phone offers. And it offers a lot!

    • Jeremiah Lawrence

      Ha, pick one up and see for yourself. I had a iPhone 4 and a MS7 in both hands at the ATT store. BY FAR the MS7 is ASTOUNDING in visual aspects. BUT worthless if you don’t have fb, zune, live, etc.

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    The author marvels at kinetic scrolling and the behaviour at the end of lists like it’s something unheard of. May I remind Will that these features and many others described are in iPhones from 2007?
    But then again, he may be too young to remember…

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

  • Me

    “Say your hands are tied up but you need to make a phone call or search for […] From anywhere on your phone, press and hold the Start button to use the […]”

    Oh, come on, do you really read what you are writing? Hands tied up but press and hold the button? With what, the nose?

    • Eddypp976

      Hahaa im writing this on a wp7 but that comment still made me laugh ;)

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

    • Anonymous

      Mobile IE9 (which came out on the WP7 Mango Update in Sept 2011) now scores 141 and 5 bonus points… which is the same score as IE9 on my PC.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • http://twitter.com/robinfnixon Robin Nixon

    “It handles HTML5 without problem” – Nope. It scores 12 out of 300 at http://html5test.com.

  • please don’t crash

    You must be joking. Facebook integration is a plus? And what if I do not have facebook account? Half of the phone screens is useless. Prettinessof tiles is a matter of individual taste. For me they are terrible , but how will those tiles work if I install 30 custom applications? Finding anything will be hard.

    • Ucyimda_Ruler

      I bought the HD7 and I do not have a facebook or twitter account. Seing how Twitter isn’t yet available there’s no problem there but if you don’t have facebook then that’s one screen/application you don’t use. Same concept if you do not have netflix.

      With this phone you can just uninstall the application and move on with your life.

      Last bit. You mentioned not be able to find anything. You control how those tiles are organizationed on the home screen and it can support up to 265 tiles I believe. The next screen has the full list alphabetized.

      • http://www.facebook.com/theofficialleewalton Lee Walton

        Just as a point of reference, Twitter IS available as 3rd party, just like EVERY other smartphone. The Twitter integration they are speaking of it how Facebook integrates the contacts, which is necessarily something I’d want anyway. Twitter SHOULD be seperate because those are people who CHOSE to follow you, and not necessarily people you want in your contacts or even know!

        • Anonymous

          You can control which contacts you want to see – you can remove all Twitter and all Facebook contacts from the list if you desire.

          You can also link contacts (i.e. phone + windows live + facebook) to show only one entry for a person. You can then contact that person by phone, email, write on their FB page, mention them on twitter or chat to them via sms/messenger/facebook – all through the same interface.

          When you post a status update you can post to Windows Live / Facebook / Twitter at the same time, or just choose specific ones.

          If you don’t have Facebook or Twitter then you won’t see those options…. it’s really quite simple.

    • whatever

      it’s more minimalistic design on WP7’s UI, I like it. I guess it is a joke if reviewers judge and rate the looks of UI nowaday, because it is “a matter of individual taste”.

  • http://adamhaider.com Adam Haider

    During the PDC10 conference, Microsoft announced they are now focusing their efforts on HTML5 and not so much on Silverlight in terms of a flash player alternative, so it’s a sign that HTML5 support should be coming to Windows Phone 7 in the near future.

    I imagine after the US launch next week and the January 2011 update, WP7 will gain more traction and further improve their platform and continue to listen to what people are saying. — It’s only going to get better. WP7 is not going to end up like the KIN because the KIN did not have a proper eco-system and infrastructure in-place — now they have Bing Search/Map integration, Zune eco-system, SkyDrive and Windows Live which allows users to integrate all their social networks in one place.

    One of the major catalysts for the success of BB and iPhone is due to trends and media time in fashion magz, ads, music videos and box office films. If Microsoft can pull off what RIM and Apple did by hosting PR events and give out phones to celebrities to endorse, that should start changing consumers perception on Microsoft but they would need to roll it out fast and everywhere.

  • TJ FlyBoy

    “Unlike the iPhone, you can actually attach images to an email from within the email client. With iPhone, if you finish writing an email and decide that you want to attach a photo, you have to copy the text, trash your current email, go to your photo, share it via email, and then paste the text back into the email. With WP7, all you have to do is click the “attach” icon at the bottom of the screen and you can choose the picture(s) you’d like to attach.”

    Unfortunately, this information on iOS is incorrect. If you wish to add a photo while composing an email, just multi-task your way over to your photo browser, copy the photo you wish to include, and then multi-task back to your email and paste. Perhaps not quite as elegant as an ‘attach photo’ feature, but functional. Just another reason why a modern mobile operating system should have cut/paste functionality.

    • Lee Walton

      @TJ FlyBoy
      Um…are you slow? You rightly stated that the iOS solution is NOT as elegant as the attach photo feature and then go on to say, “just another reason why a modern mobile OS should have cut/paste functionality.” That is RETARDED! Your last statement is ONLY relevant if the OS DOES NOT have a more elegant solution AND WM7 DOES! Apple CAN’T make people this mindless! If it does, I’m throwing my iPad away!

    • Lee Walton

      @TJ FlyBoy
      Um…are you slow? You rightly stated that the iOS solution is NOT as elegant as the attach photo feature and then go on to say, “just another reason why a modern mobile OS should have cut/paste functionality.” That is RETARDED! Your last statement is ONLY relevant if the OS DOES NOT have a more elegant solution AND WM7 DOES! Apple CAN’T make people this mindless! If it does, I’m throwing my iPad away!

  • Anonymous

    The user guide on the T-Mobile site for the HTC HD7 says that it DOES support Wi-Fi hotspots . . .

    • Anonymous

      I was referring to the Mobile HotSpot feature – review updated to clarify that point.

  • Rentallight

    One issue with the review above, Apps do persist in the background if they have been written using the provided Phone API to persist the data. The review is wrong in this area.

  • Slobodan Ivkovic

    Heh, I’m mobile app developer, and I will never write an app for Windows phone 7, I can promise you that. And I don’t have facebook account

    • http://www.facebook.com/theofficialleewalton Lee Walton

      We in the Windows Phone 7 community want you to signed a legally binding document stating such, so that we will see how stupid you feel when you are locked out of developing for a successfull Windows Phone 7 platform.

    • Lee Walton

      We have yet to receive that signed statement, so we can officially ban you from development on this platform. Once you have remitted that, we will file it with the county clerk, and any breach by you will be subject to huge financial penalty. Get a clue dude! Real developers, develop, they don’t sit in a corner and whine or take sides.

    • Rickyishiding

      By mobile app developer, he means an anonymous entity online, which can claim to any profession thinking it adds some kind of authority in his comment implying the platform will fail. He did all this without realizing how ignorant his statement was.

    • Twiggy6x3

      Why? are you stupid or something? You are just limiting yourself. WP7 is pretty bad ass and it is getting better by the minute.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ricky.russell Rick Russell

    fantastic review. you don’t see many unbiased reviews these days

  • Lukeguy2007

    its everything I want. I use facebook, zune, xboxlive, and windows live. This is the phone for me.

    • http://twitter.com/alittlenegative A Little Negative

      Yeah that’s what struck me as I read this. If you’re already in the microsoft ecosystem, this is PERFECT. For someone like me who uses google for everything, not so much. But it is a sexy phone, I will give microsoft that.

      • Twiggy6x3

        I would say most people are in the MS ecosystem. PC, XBOX, plus it integrates real easily with Facebook, Windows Live and the others are coming soon!

      • Twiggy6x3

        I would say most people are in the MS ecosystem. PC, XBOX, plus it integrates real easily with Facebook, Windows Live and the others are coming soon!

  • Guest

    “Let’s start off with the obvious. Windows Phone 7 is the sexiest smartphone OS that we’ve yet seen. It’s super model sexy. It’s got that undercover hotness factor that belies the elegance and poise of its design aesthetic. …” hahaha…
    How much did Microsoft pay you to write this?

    • Guest

      ” “Let’s start off with the obvious. Windows Phone 7 is the sexiest smartphone OS that we’ve yet seen. It’s super model sexy. It’s got that undercover hotness factor that belies the elegance and poise of its design aesthetic. …” hahaha…
      How much did Microsoft pay you to write this? ”

      hahaha… how much did (insert Apple / Google / Palm / RIM) pay you to write this?

      See what I did there Anon guest? I posted as an Anon guest and showed you how dumb your comment was.

      Go away troll.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ERBE7HGEWIPMYUELWQCJ4TKLBY Hubert

    This really is a dumbass article. All the features you claim it lacks will be coming to the platform soon.

    – Copy and Paste
    – Tethering
    – Multi-tasking
    – Flash
    – Silverlight
    – HTML5
    – Twitter integration

    All of these are coming, probably by the end of summer 2011. Microsoft simply wanted the OS released for the holiday season. You could argue that they should have waited, but it’s irrelevant. WP7 can and will do everything iOS or Android can do very soon. It can also many things better. Too long to list here. Hell, Android can’t even manage to scroll smoothly. They better conquer that before they try anything else. WP7 outperforms Android on far lesser hardware. Google could also try creating an OS that doesn’t look like warmed of dog ****.

  • Morris Lewkowicz

    Truly amazes me that there is no mention to how this mobile works as a ‘phone”. After all, irrespective of how well this products performs as a mini computer, in the great majority of cases, most people will spend more time using this (or similar) device as phones. And yet, most of the hoo-ha is about how it works best as a computer……??

  • Anonymous

    Were you paid by Microsoft for this review?
    “it’s hands-down the sexiest smartphone OS out there.”
    You must be kidding.
    I have used Ios, android and WP7 and it is obvious that WP7 was designed by a commitee which seldom is good.
    It is hobbled by the fact that MS is trying to avoid the “just copying apple” label and all those MS bean counters that learned that you “must differentiate or die” in MBA school.

    WP7 feels like being in a jail. you cannot control the phone or bend it to your preferences, you cant change font sizes, contrast settings or lose those ridiculous tiles for icons should you so wish. WP7 wastes lot of display on  unneccesary whitespace.

    You cant change from Bing to google even though the latter is superior in all possible ways.
    The stupid search button is constantly in the way and Bling popups, disrupting my workflow
    WP7 couldnt figure out my network settings even though both my aged Iphone 3G and my Htc Hd2 both did it without prompting on the same network. there are endless annoyances like this

    I am convinced that all those people claiming that they think wp7 is far better than Ios are astroturfers, shame on you.

  • http://lev-tec.com.au/ Tile Levelling system

    One of the issues was that there was little thought about the floor until late in the project. This happens a lot. Flooring should be the first consideration in every project then design and build from there, not the other way around.

  • http://lev-tec.com.au/ Tile Levelling system

    The floor looked awesome when complete. It took 3 people about 90 minutes to resurface 1200 square feet. When complete you could see a perfect transition at all the doorways, entrance door could swing open freely, transition to tile in kitchen was perfect.

  • Jackjack

    Does “Metro” means some sort of NY homosexual?

  • Anonymous

    Just to update on the “The Bad”

    – Doesn’t support external storage

    True – this is still coming to future models. You have a 25 GB SkyDrive to supplement your internal storage (usually 16 GB or 8GB) and this allows you to store your photos and music off your device.

    – Lack of cut/paste functionality (coming in early 2011)

    This came out with NoDo around February 2011.

    – No WiFi Mobile Hotspot feature

    This is now available for a majority of phone models.

    – Lack of Twitter integration (coming soon)

    This is now fully integrated as of Mango which came out in September 2011.

    – Finnicky Google integration

    The article doesn’t specify in what way. You can currently pin google to your homescreen and access gmail and google calendar.

    – No unified inbox or threaded email

    This is fully integrated as of Mango which came out in September 2011. You can unify as many mailboxes as you like with threaded emails.

    – Many apps don’t persist in the background

    The Mango update (which came out in September 2011) allows multitasking and apps to persist in the background i.e. streaming music while your browsing. Most apps that need this have been updated by the developers.

    – Most of the OS is optimized for portrait view (landscape orientation isn’t as ubiquitous as we’d like)

    Depends where else you would like it to tbe landscape… iphone and android phones aren’t fully landscape capable either (in all areas).

    The browser has also been updated to IE9 which supports HTML5 and hardware acceleration

  • Anonymous

    sorry, double posted

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