BlackBerry 10 shows promise, but unlikely to draw customers away from other platforms

RIM CEO at BlackBerry World 2012

RIM showed off Blackberry 10 yesterday to a press hungry for the day the company becomes relevant again. The platform won’t release to the public until 2013, though the software is nearly completion as RIM prepares for carrier testing. There was a lot to like about Blackberry 10 from CEO Thorsten Heins’ keynote, from the demo of Peek, to the BlackBerry Hub and the updated BBM messenger service, but I can’t help but feel underwhelmed with RIMs offering, that it simply won’t and can’t compete in a market that left it behind years ago.

I wake up today much more excited by Windows Phone 8, and the promise and simplicity it brings to the table. The handsets are fresh, colorful, and offer a different feel than the boring black or white slabs we’ve grown accustomed to, while its clear RIM doesn’t want to rock the boat too much with Blackberry. Sure, the BlackBerry Dev Alpha devices won’t be released to the general public, but the latest model released yesterday is likely modeled after the first touch-only Blackberry 10 device, and points to more of the same.

I’m simply not excited by BlackBerry 10, and I bet many customers aren’t either. To be fair, there are customers who prefer RIMs services such as BBM, but the number of loyal customers has dropped significantly in recent years, and while Blackberry 10 might succeed in hanging onto the base, it likely won’t get new customers in the door, nor will it likely draw customers back into RIM’s camp.

Blackberry 10 needed an operating system and platform that would erase years of negative consumer sentiment toward the company, something that would excite people. What they delivered, however, was something on par with what’s out there today in rivals Android, iOS, and Windows Phone, and without a true “wow” factor, RIM will likely find themselves on the outside looking in once more in 2013.

  • Poorjob

    Sadly you haven’t actually said anything about the actual device. Were you actually there or did you watch a youtube video? What was promising about the device ….after all that’s what you topic / title states . If you wanted to write an windows phone article do that ….if u running behind in your article just tell the editor you couldn’t get the story done 

    • Traceamar

      +1
      This seem to be another article that just wants to bash RIM no matter what…..
      I watched a video demoing WP8 (SDK final release) at wpcentral – that was quite disappointing.
      Comparing the 2 videos BB10 looks like a winner

      I have been using Lumia 800 for 8+ months, and the BB10 looks to have the muscle and intelligence

      This article is poorly put together with incomplete (and misleading) information. Please do your research before posting an article. This is like a referree that has too much influence on the game…..

  • Anonymous

    The platform won’t release to the public until 2013,  REALLY?!? C’mon! 

    • Jjohna001

      Yes really. Do you know how long it took Apple to develop iOS or Google to develop Android? Years! They were being built before these companies were even selling phones, so nobody was aware of them and how long it took to develop. Don’t confuse creating a platform for creating a handset. .

    • Jjohna001

      Yes really. Do you know how long it took Apple to develop iOS or Google to develop Android? Years! They were being built before these companies were even selling phones, so nobody was aware of them and how long it took to develop. Don’t confuse creating a platform for creating a handset. .

  • Jjohna001

    Your article title is misleading. People will read it and think this is a fact, when in reality it is just conjucture. Your opinion is not news or fact. This is misleading and bashing.

    • King1

      how is the title misleading? The wording conveys that it is an opinion/speculation, not fact.

      • Jjohna001

        How is it misleading? How isn’t it? The wording makes a clear statement as though it was a fact without any qualifiers that it is an opinion. It would convey speculation if the author had wrote, “but I don’t think” or “I doubt.” He just wrote, “but unlikely to draw customers away from other platforms.” Doesn’t state according to who. He should have clearly wrote that it was his opinion. A good honest journalist would never leave a title ambigous even if I bought your argument. But there is not room for interpretation, he clearly wrote it as though it was a fact. Did not once anywhere indicate or imply it was his opinion. Shame on you.

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