Windows Phone 7 Is Doomed to Fail

steve-ballmer-worried

Windows Phone 7 has yet to inspire much confidence in anyone, but it’s probably unfair to judge so quickly since it won’t be officially unveiled until Monday. Still, there have been plenty of previews and demos of the platform that some have felt confident enough to say that WP7 will “flounder.”

As a matter of fact, InformationWeek says that Windows Phone 7 will “barely move the needle on the company’s dismal share of the smartphone OS market, according to new data released Wednesday by industry analysts at Gartner.” Ouch!

Gartner even throws in specific numbers in terms of where Microsoft will be when it comes to the rest of the field:

Gartner predicts the release of Windows Phone 7 will help bump Microsoft’s share of the worldwide market from 4.7% in 2010 to 5.2% in 2011, but says the company’s share will ultimately decline to just 3.9% by 2014.

By then, Microsoft will badly trail virtually every other major mobile OS developer, according to Gartner. The firm predicts the Symbian OS will continue to lead the market in 2014, with a 30.2% stake, just barely ahead of Google’s Android. Gartner sees Android’s share ballooning to 29.6% by 2014, up from 17.7% in 2010 and just 3.9% in 2009.

If the analysts are to be believed, it doesn’t look like Microsoft can do anything to stop the momentum that Android is building for itself, or the current market leader, Symbian.

Unfortunately, some consumers remain cynical because of the bad taste that Windows Mobile has left behind. Can the company responsible for such a poorly thought out OS be capable of burying its competitors? Microsoft seems to think so, but I’m having a hard time finding anyone else who shares its sentiment.

My thought is that Windows Phone 7 probably won’t oust Android or iOS in terms of popularity and market share, but it can’t be anywhere near as bad as Windows Mobile. Or the Kin 1 and 2, remember those things?

[Via: InformationWeek]

  • fdsaf

    As if any one cares what you say dude.

    • Marin Perez

      Dude, I care.

      • tj

        Dude, I don’t. I would like to if there is any facts and proper reasoning. It hard to believe that someone write this so easily without look at the fact or have a hand/eye/ear on it.

        InfoWorld never said one thing that doesn’t suggest msft will fail. Gartner is a credible company, but I just have hard time to believe how they come with those numbers. I don’t think they ever touched a wp7 device. It is not released yet.

        what a shocker!

        • http://www.intomobile.com Marc Flores

          That’s funny, because I have had my hands on Windows Phone 7 devices as far back as four months ago.

          http://www.intomobile.com/2010/06/23/fresh-new-look-at-windows-phone-7/

          • sh1sh1

            You used final production WP7 sw four months ago? Really?
            What final hardware did you use, Dell Lighting? Samsung Omnia 7? Do tell!

          • cassius

            how stupid can you be? and you call yourself an editor of a tech review site??everybody knows whatever you had 4 months ago was not final hardware or software!! wow.

          • Jeff F

            I agree with Gartner’s prediction that Windows Phone 7 will fail. Other analysts come to the same conclusion. Just look at Goldman Sachs downranking Micrsooft earlier this week.

            The feature set (or in this case, missing feature set) of Windows Phone 7 is well known. What the OS can or can’t do is already known, regardless of what hardware device it is on.

            Windows Phone 7′s failure is predicted not on issues which are related to hardware. It is based on the OS features and Microsoft’s market potential, which can be predicted by factors such as the number of OEMs on board, the number of handsets, and carrier relations.

            It’s also based on the belief that Microsoft needs to hit the ground running, and have immediate success. The Xbox style of releasing an unpopular product at first, but building it up over many years, is likely not possible with Windows Phone 7 due to the dynamics of the mobile industry, and the multi-layers of having separate OS vendor, OEMs and the power of mobile network carriers.

            There is zero chance that Windows Phone 7 will be a success in the near term.

          • Bob

            Office/One Note and Xbox Live are enough to sell phone to millions of people, and that’s just 2 features of phone. You better start coming up with excuses when Windows Phone 7 is a success.

          • sh1sh1

            @ Jeff F

            “The feature set (or in this case, missing feature set) of Windows Phone 7 is well known. What the OS can or can’t do is already known, regardless of what hardware device it is on.”

            The original iPhone lacked at least 20 key smartphone features, yet it did pretty well didn’t it? Until 4 months ago the iPhone was lagging in terms of hardware — it mattered not. What is missing from WP7?

            Copy/paste (coming later)
            3rd party multitasking (coming later once performance stabilizes)
            Tethering (did I hear hack?)

            Feautres that are not that critical to most consumers. However, we have some people including tech “journalists” announcing impending doom. I’m glad they don’t run my company.

            “Windows Phone 7?s failure is predicted not on issues which are related to hardware. It is based on the OS features and Microsoft’s market potential, which can be predicted by factors such as the number of OEMs on board, the number of handsets, and carrier relations.”

            Microsoft has some of the largest handset manufacturers on board: LG, Samsung. Then there’s and perhaps Motorola. Oh and ALL of the networks (all in the UK and France, all in the US and Canada, etc.).

            “It’s also based on the belief that Microsoft needs to hit the ground running, and have immediate success. The Xbox style of releasing an unpopular product at first, but building it up over many years, is likely not possible with Windows Phone 7 due to the dynamics of the mobile industry, and the multi-layers of having separate OS vendor, OEMs and the power of mobile network carriers.”

            Xbox is the best-selling console in America.

            WP7 is

            The OfficePhone
            The ZunePhone (Zunepass is hard to beat as a deal)
            The XboxPhone
            Free Cloud storage
            One of the best (if not the best in terms of user-friendliness) email client
            CHOICE of hardware
            CHOICE of carrier
            A brand new UI that’s not based on the same boring grid-of-icons being used since 1999

            Somehow you think this level of commitment and effort is a doomed scenario. Wow. Please stay away from management!

            “There is zero chance that Windows Phone 7 will be a success in the near term.”

            Zero chance… I’ll write down those words.

            Also, perhaps Microsoft is not run by canines, who can only think in the present moment and don’t remember a week ago, let alone considering long trends.

          • Jay

            @sh1sh1

            “The original iPhone lacked at least 20 key smartphone features, yet it did pretty well didn’t it? Until 4 months ago the iPhone was lagging in terms of hardware — it mattered not. What is missing from WP7?”

            The original iPhone lacked many of today’s feattures…in 2007. It’s not 2007 anymore. I do, however, agree that lacking copy/paste, tethering, and true multi-tasking are issues that most consumers don’t give a damn about. While I appreciated having copy/paste on my Android phone, I haven’t even used it yet.

            “Microsoft has some of the largest handset manufacturers on board: LG, Samsung. Then there’s and perhaps Motorola. Oh and ALL of the networks (all in the UK and France, all in the US and Canada, etc.).”

            Initially, only T-Mobile and AT&T (US) will have it. Verizon and Sprint won’t carry it until it has CDMA support. But yes, most GSM carriers will have it.

            “Xbox is the best-selling console in America.”

            True, so long as you ignore consoles that are outselling it. The Wii has sold more consoles in the states than the Xbox, putting the Xbox at 2nd out of three. Also, since the price drop, the PS3 has outsold the Xbox, bringing the two consoles closer to parity. Globally, the PS3 has nearly caught up with the Xbox (outselling it in Europe and Japan). By this time next year, the Xbox is liekly to be in 3rd globally, and hanging on to 2nd place in the US over the PS3 by a thread.

    • vasra

      Ah, the fanboyism.

      MS has a hard road in front of them:

      – unfinished OS (no flash, no sd-fileformat, no copy/paste, etc). Even they admit it’ll take 5 years to bring WP where it should be
      – very little 3rd party software support at launch (binary incompatible with old software)
      – unconvinced partners (Dell: “Wait and see”, Samsung: “Here are our test handsets, let’s see how it does”)
      – totally new UI which is consumer oriented along with other features like Zune/Xbox
      – out-of-consumer range pricing (due to hw alone)
      – completely different UI/UX for corporate customers who hate to learn things for their job
      – near zero interest outside USA (remember, USA is still but <25% of the smart phone market)
      – expensive OS, when everybody else is offering free
      – difficult monetization strategy (OS? Services? bleed till there's enough market share?)

      Yes, MS has clout, money, tenacity and currently some decent names backing the hw portfolio.

      But it'll take at least three years to take WP7 anywhere worldwide.

      My guess it'll fail outside USA big time and make a small dent in the US during the first year or two. After that, who knows.

  • rj

    Wow. You cite one article that cites ‘analysts’ from one firm and that equates to no confidence in anyone on the OS’ prospects? I haven’t had a difficult time finding optimistic assessments. I’m a bit surprised you can’t.

    • http://www.intomobile.com Marc Flores

      I’m surprised, too, considering I have many colleagues and friends in the tech industry and none seem all that optimistic about Windows Phone 7.

      • sh1sh1

        Interesting. Just going by some names/sites: Engadget, Gizmodo, PocketNow and even Apple’s #1 fanboy John Gruber, all think that WP7 will be a real, strong competitor to iOS and Android. They’ve all tried pre-production WP7 devices and SW as well, so you know.

        • http://www.intomobile.com Marc Flores

          I read and have friends on all those sites. Not once do I ever recall any of them, Gruber included, saying that WP7 is going to be a “strong” competitor to iOS. You’re just pulling that one from out of thin air.

          I’ve also, on a number of occasions, used Windows Phone 7.

          • Bob

            Most tech writers are, to put it bluntly, gutless. They won’t risk their credibility by backing an unreleased product…unless it’s from Apple. They’ll also tick off their iPhone and Android readers. Metro UI is innovative. Anybody who can’t see that is a hack.

          • sh1sh1

            John Gruber, Today 10/06/2010:

            “[WP7 is a] real, credible competitor”
            “in terms of polish and quality, it’s absolutely very, very impressive.”
            “iPhone caliber”

            I won’t even bother to count the lack of negativity or doom-mongering from Engadget, Pocketnow, etc.

          • http://sharkaat.deviantart.com Denis

            I presume you’ve only written this article in order to get attention, no matter if it is negative. No one from those more popular sites said that wp7 will immediately surpass or be on par (at the moment of introduction) with current mobile platforms (particularly sales results), but all of them have said something among the lines of “more than capable platform”. If you failed to read that…oh wait. You did.

            Your objectivity failed completely while comparing it with Kin1&2. Still, I am convinced you wrote this only to get more attention. Hell, you’ve done it. Congrats and welcome to the yellow journalism world. I hope you enjoy your doomhammering bs.

            Article is a joke.

          • Idzoone

            Tell you what… maybe you are trying to get something from microsoft, or are paid by google or apple to put shit on the internet to make people not help WP7 succeed but i tell you this product is solid and i personally will by a WP7 as soon as it hits the shelf on t-mobile despite the fact that i just renewed my contract.
            as for Engadget, Gizmodo, PocketNow and John Gruber they all did infact testify to WP7 genius. your information is soo 2008… wake up and smell the WP7 Dell lightning, Samsung omnia, Htc Hd7 they all rock so far.

  • G c

    I care and I really do not think that it is doomed to fail. I feel that they have a lot of great user friendly ideas. Also it is the first series in a new design and you cannot expect perfection or to be able to compare against 2nd 3rd and 4th generation phones. If we can all remember iPhone was not perfect first time out and neither was android and they still have some room for improvement.

  • Nobodi Nobodee

    Analysts? These people only look at numbers and their computer models to speculate. They don’t understand technology, and they don’t understand the universe of applications and the user experiences, nor do they understand the significance of marketing shifts caused by industrial seismic changes. I’m not predicting a hit for Windows Phone 7. I only know that I would get one. For a very simple reason: It has Office finally promising to be synchronized in the Cloud with my real workspace, and is therefore the only phone that I can actually do some serious work as a professional one I don’t have access to a computer. It just happens to also have a user interface that arrivals iPhone.

    The entire smart phone industry took on an unfortunate turn from the fairly practical (but not sexy) Palm and BlackBerry to iPhone, which was essentially created for mass-market whose dominant decision-making motive is based on sensation. (I have always felt that these toys are made for teenage girls, but that’s a different story.) But iPhone created a new standard for user interface, and that is a good thing to happen. Now, Windows Phone 7 sounds like a first serious professional tool that also has a strong user interface. Will it take a significant market share from iPhone and Android? I don’t know. I only know that finally there is a phone that I want to buy after the seven years old Palm Treo, which by the way did not do what I wanted my smart phone to do, but nor did any other phone ever made in the past, hence no reason to change.

  • Nobodi Nobodee

    I apologize for the typos in the previous post. They are errors caused by my voice recognition software. Should have done some proofreading before posting. But here goes again:

    Analysts? These people only look at numbers and their computer models to speculate. They don’t understand technology, and they don’t understand the universe of applications and the user experiences, nor do they understand the significance of marketing shifts caused by industrial seismic changes. I’m not predicting a hit for Windows Phone 7. I only know that I would get one. For a very simple reason: It has Office finally promising to be synchronized in the Cloud with my real workspace, and is therefore the only phone that I can actually do some serious work as a professional when I don’t have access to a computer. It just happens to also have a user interface that rivals iPhone.

    The entire smart phone industry took on an unfortunate turn from the fairly practical (but not sexy) Palm and BlackBerry to iPhone, which was essentially created for mass-market whose dominant decision-making motive is based on sensation. (I have always felt that these toys are made for teenage girls, but that’s a different story.) But iPhone created a new standard for user interface, and that is a good thing to happen. Now, Windows Phone 7 sounds like a first serious professional tool that also has a strong user interface. Will it take a significant market share from iPhone and Android? I don’t know. I only know that finally there is a phone that I want to buy after the seven years old Palm Treo, which by the way did not do what I wanted my smart phone to do, but nor did any other phone ever made in the past, hence no reason to change.

  • TD

    This article is a joke.

  • Drew

    I agree wholeheartedly – the overwhelming majority of any previews of WP7 out there (and there are many, many of them) are, if not outright positive, certainly inspire SOME confidence. Yet “Marc” skews that completely for the sake of a doomsayer headline and can’t even reference his source directly. What REALLY doesn’t inspire much confidence is that my “Windows Phone” search in Google News pointed me to this drivel.

    • sh1sh1

      Just to put a couple of examples, John Gruber, famous “journalist” and rabid fanboy of all things Apple, tried a WP7 proto and was impressed and said it has iPhone-equivalent fluidity, UI, and keyboard. Josh Topolsky Editor of Engadget did an exhaustive PREVIEW of the WP7 and gave it lots of praise, even acknowledging some advantages over iPhone. Josh T.’s preference for iProducts is no secret.

      I’d like to know who are these special minds who are sure that WP7 will fail, and why.

  • duk3togo

    Wow, if I believed analyst then the recession has been over since mid 2009. I don’t see an improvement so the analysis is garbage. Considering the Symbian OS looks like crap and even Nokia is opting to make a WP7 phone.

  • ernesto

    This guy and those who have negative opinions on windows seem to be paid to cause confusion among those who see something possitive about MSFT. The truth is that no body knows how is the OS gonna work and just to keep people buying Apple over MSFT they dream and talk about a unstoppable failure on MSFT side. Talking like this is not professional and lowers your credibility as a writter or reporter. I suggest u wait, see, and then open ur mouth.

    • cassius

      i think you are right,there seems to be people on every article about wp7 commenting negatively about it before its even out their aim to create confusion in peoples minds and discourage from buying.its disgusting how some pple have become so obsessed with iphone to the extent that they act as if they own shares in apple or they own it to the point they feel they have to protect it and deal with competition threats themselves.lets be grown up and mature and give props were they are due,this OS looks great,way different from WM and most things out there! hats off too to apple for what they did with the iphone,they saw were WM was going wrong and filled the gap but i think WP7 is on the right track!

  • Jeff F

    It’s not only the bad taste left behind by Windows Mobile.

    It’s the bad taste left behind by PlaysForSure (Microsoft’s first attempt against the iPod), Zune, Sidekick, the Kin debacle, and now Windows Phone 7.

    It’s not just one analyst firm. Most of the major analyst firms are predicting Windows Phone 7′s failure.

    So people thinking of buying Windows Phone 7 handsets should be aware that there is a very good chance they will be left with a failed platform. Also, people should avoid the first Windows Phone 7 handsets, as there are a lot of problems in the first generation, like lack of Copy/Paste, no tethering to a laptop, no multitasking for the apps you install, and software programs unable to talk to hardware (the apps you install can’t see the phone’s compass or video camera). If you really must get Windows Phone 7, wait for the second generation (Windows Phone 8).

    • cassius

      and you say this because??you own an actual device and have seen all these problems first hand???? as if iphone was perfect when it first came out! im no microsoft or apple supporter but if one of them makes something i like i will buy! my advise to you is let people make their own informed choices based on the actual device when it comes out not based on your gibberish!

  • greg newman

    I think there are so many people that will be buying Cell phones that if Microsoft advertises their Product right and prices it right they will sell a lot of phones especially to people who are not as critical AS a lot of people over the
    phones missing features beside it’s sure better than a lot of cell phones that are out there if I were microsoft I
    would sell it at a low price as a good entry level smart phone it get a following of People who would like it and spread the word it’s a good phone and a great buy that’ill work

  • ken

    as if the gartners people really know what they say. these so called *analysts* are nothing but a load of nonsense.
    if windows phone 7 does fail, it’s got nothing to do with the phone itself, but the public’s fixation on buying apple products and the illusion that google are 100% wholesome.

  • Andrew

    Next time, learn what the word “doomed” means before you get all sensationalist on us.
    For the record, one company’s prediction that something will be less successful than a competitor does not equate to failure. Even if Gartner’s predictions are correct, there’s nothing to suggest Microsoft won’t keep pushing.

    Keep in mind that these kinds of predictions are based only on what is known now, and not on speculated changes that are coming. MS will release things like copy/paste, but Gartner isn’t counting on that information when predicting the future, because they can’t rely on information they don’t formally have.

  • Hinge

    Seems like sensationalist journalism to me, I know several people that are interested in what WP7 will offer – both from business and leisure aspects. I have found developing apps for the device simple, even with my limited skills, so those out there who are infinitely more talented will do greater things and hey – they don’t need to buy a Mac for the job!

    Whether you have used a WP7 device or not, it seems your focus is selfish, as a headline like this will get you many hits, unfortunately I was one who was drawn in by it.

    Still buying into WP7, just as many mobile manufacturers have – could they all be wrong? Should they stick with Symbian?

  • Jay

    You can always sense the fear in the writings of those that disseminate such profligate nonesense. what we are seeing here people are the minnions make their last feable attempt to justify why apple is annoyingly still giving the rest of us sleepless nights with over marketted and over expensive lifestyle choice. But I promise you when he wakes from his fantastical sleep, where apple is the only OS in his world, to realise microsoft with XBox, Zune and Office have all integrated with the cloud and are run through a beautiful little device called Windows Phone 7 powered by silverlight and XNA, then the sad little man will realise the iphone looks all of a sudden so 2008 and will to die of the same fate that windows mobile did. Microsoft’s little babies are hot and i suggest all those trapping about it’s failure had better look out. Cos the sleeping giant has just about harnessed every area of entertainment and made it, what we all have wished for for the last ten years, one sexy, hell of a fight! I only have to say….want want want!

  • Tim

    I’m an iPhone user(3GS – not for long) and can’t wait to make the switch when Windows Phone 7 comes out.
    Windows phone 7 has a lottt of features that iPhone doesn’t have.
    ———–
    - XBox Live (60+games at launch)
    - Office (edit documents on the fly)
    - Email (Best email service ever includes Exchenge)
    - Camera (you don’t have to start your phone and go through to get to camera-1 click boom)
    - calendar
    - msn messenger
    - Yout get to choose the phone Samsung, HTC, Dell, Asus and not get stuck on 1 design like the whole class it sucks I know..
    ————
    what else does anyone need?? If you do then there will be thousands of applications that will work just fine for that purpse…

  • Bob

    Gartner was wrong with their Apple and Android predictions at launch. Why the heck would Gartner be correct with their Windows Phone 7 predictions?
    I’ll cross this website and this writer off my list. Clueless.

    • Jordan

      It’s pretty clear that Marc is biased against Windows.

    • http://sharkaat.deviantart.com Denis

      Couldn’t agree more. Filtering this site due to such an editor is a must. Hope he enjoyed +1 visit (and last one for that matter) due to epic fail of a headline and even more of an article fail.

  • Vic

    Well, I predict a lasting success for Win Phone 7.

    It’s funny to see how people just keep using the same arguments they have read on other websites. And these didn’t make sense in the first place.

    The missing features for example : they will be added in the form of updates (just like Windows desktop updates) in the following few months, not in a following generation OS or device.

    And I’ve read a lot of enthusiastic reviews of Win7. Where are you guys getting your infos?

  • fred flintstone

    And one wonders why the stock market is a joke when this sort of thing passes as “analysis”

    Oddly enough, John Gruber, a hard core Mac advocate likes WP7, and sees it as a credible competitor.

    IDC sees WP7 having roughly 10% of the market by 2014, only slightly behind Apple.

    I just wonder what all these people are going to say and do when WP7 is successful, unless of course they are currently cashing a check from someone to spread negative opinions.

  • rruffman

    this editor must be a iphone fanboy… att in the us has jumped on to wp7 full force and made it no secret with several models at launch and is it att who made iphone popular?? if it wasnt for att pushing iphone like it did where would iphone be today??

  • rc

    Forget about Goldman Sach analyst ratings and all. Some people are out there to sway the public into concluding without thinking. Marc, read what you wrote again, your article has weak arguments.

    I think Windows Phone 7 will not be a flop because of one reason: carrier support. Why? Because network providers DO NOT want any single platform to dominate the cell phone industry.

    Look at microsoft in the 90s. When one OS dominates, hardware companies lost bargaining power.

    Smartphone market is the same, hardware, software and with an extra player this time, the network providers. Everyone is going to do their best to make sure nobody dominates the market like the PC market. Samsung LG and HTC coming out with Andriod and WP7 devices.

    And the carriers, imagine what the world will be for them if everyone only wants an iPhone? Then Apple will have absolute power over them and everything becomes a price war for them. So the carriers will do whatever it takes to promote all other platforms to equalize the market.

    Of course, if the OS truly sucks, then no marketing dollars can safe it. But, do you truly think that it has absolutely no value proposition to anyone??

  • dstevens

    No multi-tasking and copy and paste is enough for me to say no. And what’s the deal with the font on particular screens consuming a quarter of the realestate!!

  • James Foster

    One thing everyone missed is the developer kit. Android has a crappy SDK and tools. That is why there are very few quality Android apps. Even the more useful or powerful tools are as ugly as sin. Many apps are just shortcuts to webkit.
    Windows Phone has a vastly superior developer environment.
    Also think about legal issues. Every Android handset maunfacturer is facing lawsuits. The same OEMs are protected from this when they license Windows Phone.
    All the current flaws that people talk about will be fixed in the next 12-18 months through software updates.
    The only thing Microsoft can mess up is the marketing.

    And btw Symbian 4 looks very promising. From Nokia. Maybe some of you might have heard of Nokia.

  • ogre

    Do you regret making this post yet? Hahhahaha dumb ass.

  • Steve

    I am a Windows Mobile phone developer, using a WM 6.5 phone (HTC Pure). I have been waiting for the Windows Phone 7. After done the research and played with the SDK for a several weeks, I decided to say good bye to Windows phone. NO copy and paste,NO multitasking, NO SQL Compact database, NO SMS intercept, NO access to file system, NO interact with Calendar, Contract, SMS… It is impossible to develop serious business application. In the consumer side, Windows Phone is three generations behind iPhone. I don’t see there is a market for Windows Phone 7. It is just a joke! I am moving to Android.

  • Jason

    just my personal opinion here but the wm7 o/s makes me gag every time i see a video on it. i don’t like the zune type of interface where a single page is spread out over what is considered several pages on a small phone screen and you basically are sliding around on a huge screen with your 3-5″ screen. drives me crazy just looking at it.

    the main screen is about as ugly as it gets style wise. i am sure it is functional with updates but i think android hit it much better with widgets and styling like htc sense UI. the main screen on wm7 looks like something i would write on a Commodore64 back in the 80′s.

    IE is a joke these days. again just my opinion. and i don’t see it being better than a webkit port for a browser.

    Also the are trying to lock the phone down from a development point of view. they claim they need to focus on their idea for the user experience however this stifles innovation on the dev side. This method could work great for them like it did for Apple but devs will get turned off fast if there is no serious monetary sales for putting up with this bs. look at Palm Pre who tried the same thing and did a big facepalm at the end of the day. they locked it down, didn’t have a good api going into it, forced people to sell through their store because they were greedy and wanted a cut, etc. now take a look at Android and see how far they are penetrating in such a short period of time because they are open. Even Apple will have to revision their draconian methods more and more as Android puts pressure from being open…And they are questionably the leader in the mobile pack right now so they can still get away with some of this.

    i know there are a lot of people out there who grew up on winmo (which is the biggest slap to ms face IMO. they had years of a head start and blew the mobile space. people were complaining the whole time and they sat on their a.. and just thought everyone would buy their stuff because they are ms) so it will have a starting fanbase but in the end if the phone doesn’t hold water against the others people will flock. this is happening with RIM right now. You can have deep pockets and market your butt off but at the end of the day the phone doesn’t hold a candle to the others on the market…well good luck. there is coke and pepsi – everything else is a distant 3rd.

  • Taylor

    LOL

    First off, Gartner has always been Anti-Microosft so of course they are going to say this. And weren’t they the one who said Vista will be the last Windows OS. Gartner has no credibility to me nor to most people for that matter.

    And as for Goldman Sachs downranking Microsoft? Like they are so credible and trustworthy. Yeah right.

  • Pax

    Guys, why would you waste your energy trying to prove a 16 year old kid who still drinks milk at the happy hour “his room”?. There are many idiots like this guy who just will find an article (any article) to try and sell their hate. He is a fanboy alright.

  • jamal

    This article along with infoworld article belongs to the same class : trash..
    the reason author said it was hard to find people who are optimistic about winphone 7, because he didn’t bother to read other sites that gave positive reviews. what kind of journalism is that?

  • Scott

    Who is this guy? What a cabbage lol

  • sg

    1. Xbox Live gaming

    When Windows launched its Windows Mobile 6.5 OS, one critic described it as being an ‘aging hipster trying to look cool around an increasingly younger and smarter crowd’. With the inclusion of Xbox Live integrated into Windows Phone 7, the new handsets should appeal to young, tech-savvy gamers who have been crying out for a mobile gaming device. Nokia attempted it with the N-Gage, and Apple has made headway with its iPhone, but Microsoft could steal a march here and build on its hugely successful Xbox Live brand and service. Watch our first look Xbox 360 250GB video review.
    2. Microsoft Zune music

    Microsoft’s Zune is both a music playing product and an all-you-can-eat music download service. It’s been well-received in the US, but hitherto unavailable in the UK. Critics of Microsoft’s earlier mobile phone operating systems have wondered how Microsoft could get it so right with Zune but so wrong with Windows Mobile. Zune coming to Windows Phone 7 will mean Zune coming to the UK, which is going to please many music fans – particularly at £8.99 for unlimited streaming and downloading per month.
    3. Windows Phone 7 interface

    Nokia’s recent unveiling of the Nokia C6-01, the Nokia C7 and the Nokia E7 have been described as existing Nokia handsets with a paint job. The new user interface on the Windows Phone 7, however, offers a more refreshing and re-energised design. And what’s more it hasn’t just mimicked its main competitors, Android and Apple. The iPhone has its fans, but there are some users who would rather go anywhere but Apple, which means Google Android-powered mobile phones. Anything but an iPhone now may mean Android or Windows Phone 7, and the imminent launches may slow down Android’s rapid smartphone market share growth.
    4. ‘Hubs’ and finger-friendly control

    Microsoft has done away with its deep, labyrinthine menus and honeycomb interface. The new Windows Phone 7 features a large tile layout providing access to ‘hubs’ of information. Previous Windows Mobile operating systems were described as ‘glutinously slow’ with typing being comparable to ‘trying to sew with your feet’, but the new minimum hardware specifications for the Windows Mobile 7 handsets, including a capacitive touchscreen, should mean that the devices are easier to use, and certainly won’t require a stylus.
    5. Windows Phone 7 Office integration

    Previous Windows Mobile phones had links to Microsoft Office, but expect Windows Phone 7 to take its Office connectivity to a whole new level – a boon for business users. Many people are used to using Windows-based PCs and a top-end handset that comes with the ability to view and edit Office documents such as Word and Excel on Windows Phone 7 will appeal to many users.

    Has Microsoft turned a corner with Windows Phone 7, Internet Explorer 9 and the XBox Kinect? Let us know your thoughts to this question and this article on Which? Conversation.
    Windows Phone 7 rumours

    There have been a number of Windows Phone 7 handsets rumoured, including the HTC Mozart, the Samsung GT-i8700, the Dell Lightning, the HTC HD7 and HTC Mondrian. Next week we also expect to hear of mobile phones from LG and even some PC tablets running the new Microsoft OS.

    We’ll keep you abreast of developments as we hear them, and while we hope Windows Phone 7 lives up to its expectations, we’ll bring you a more detailed look at any of its shortcomings once we’ve seen a mobile phone running the new OS.

  • vangrieg

    Windows Mobile is a poorly thought out OS? Windows Mobile? A 10 (or 5 in its current incarnation) OS that’s technically still superior to competitors in many respects even now? It’s outdated, has a crappy UI by modern standards, was never meant to work with without a stylus, and all that, but man, it’s not “poorly thought out”. You just have no clue how mobile systems work, that’s the only thing I can say.

  • saf

    I totally agree with most of the posters here pathetic article, clueless journlist. I have had an Iphone for almost 2 years but I will switch to WP7, for one simple reason Office. After owning an Iphone for a while now I have realised millions of useless apps is no selling point, main thing is good surfing, good email client, good call quality, and price and I believe the WP7 will win on all of these fronts.

    Oh a few points to the author dont dont confuse Fanbois in technolody circles as people who can be taken seriously, and as far as Goldman Scahs is concerned are they not the bankers who predicted house prices would rise forever and ever.

  • vangrieg

    It should read “a 10 or 5 year old OS”

  • Anastasios-Antonios Toulkeridis

    I bet NONE of those analysts have EVER layed their hands on a Windows Phone 7 device.
    They do not state a SINGLE reason why they think it will fail. They just want it to happen.
    But it WON’T happen. Developers LOVE this platform and thererfore so will consumers.

  • steve

    with over 800 xbox games being ported to windows 7 i very very much doubt it will fail ill be binning my iphone 4 anyday for this with xbox 360 in millions of home i think this will do great xbox live on my phone with all them games class microsoft pure class

  • jonahu

    October 6, 2010 at 4:40 PM
    You can listen to the interview with John Gruber here. WP7 topic starts @54:30.
    www [dot] 5by5 [dot] tv/talkshow/10

    @59:18
    “its absolutely a real, credible competitor in this space in terms of polish and quality, it’s absolutely very, very impressive.”

  • Mr Windows

    It depends on what your definition of ‘fail’ is…if you think ‘fail’ means that Microsoft won’t dislodge Apple from the top of the heap, then I think they will fail. If you think ‘fail’ means that WindowsPhone 7 won’t be able to reclaim the #2 spot from Android, then I think they *may* fail. Or they may not. If you think ‘fail’ means that no more WindowsPhone 7 handsets won’t be gobbled up by tech-hungry consumers, then I think Microsoft will vastly outperform the naysayers’ estimates.
    Remember, this is essentially a “1.0″ product, despite the fact that 3 or 4 or 5 iterations have come before. This is a complete reboot, and Microsoft has a pretty good track record once they get a clue. Will they unseat Apple as the darling of the mobile industry? Not even really a question. Will they unseat Android? Hard to say. Will they succeed? Yes.

  • Jesse

    At this point it seems they are building a very nice framework around their technologies. With DirectX as a sublayer and a programming framework like Silverlight that scales so well it seems on paper they are doing all the right things. Their interface is very focused and intuitive, their hardware requirements seem to hit the sweet spot for mobile devices and their policies for both the marketplace and OEM’s seems to make the system very secure.

    For a year one Operating System I am actually very surprised. It really seems Microsoft has really focused on this project and will deliver not only a stable product with a well thought out framework to build on but also a very enjoyable experience.

    If by this time next year they have a solid Business Marketplace to launch it is hard to see Android or Google keeping up simply because they do not have as much control of their environments and especially work environments or services to build around.

    Heck, even today the top question I get from people about phones is how is the Exchange support.

  • Not pleased

    With no copy and paste; even in Word!
    And Outlook’s strict certificate issues making it a fight to connect and not a breeze to setup mail!
    Then why on earth was it pitched to business users!!

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