Verizon Wireless to add $2 convenience fee to bills paid online, over the phone

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Droid-Life broke the news yesterday that Verizon will charge its customers an extra $2 fee for paying their bill online or over the phone. Phonescoop reportedly contacted Verizon and confirmed this report. According to a Verizon email, the carrier  will charge customers a $2 convenience fee for single-time payments made online or over the phone.

Customers can pay their bills and avoid this fee using the following methods:

  • autopay with a credit/debit card or an electronic check
  • online  or telephone payments made via an electronic check
  • online payments sent from a personal banking account
  • payments made at an in-store kiosk
  • online, telephone or in-store payments made using a Verizon Wireless gift card or rebate card
  • standard paper check or money order payment sent via snail mail

These changes will go into effect starting January 15th and customers will be warned before they’re charged this extra fee.  Like it or not, Verizon customers who pay their bill online or via telephone each month using a credit/debit card will have to cough up this extra fee or change how they make their payment.

[Via Droid-Life and Phonescoop]

 

 

  • T-temp

    f* verizon and all the other greedy corporations.  take $2.00 off your next bill as an ‘inconvenience fee’

  • Anonymous

    If I paid online up to this point and was a Verizon customer, I would note that this is a “material adverse change” to the contract.  Material adverse changes will allow you to exit your contract without any ETF.

  • Anonymous

    Verizon’s $2 convenience fee has all the potential of backfiring on the scale of BofA’s ill-conceived $5 debit card fee.

    “Convenience fee” happens to be a technical term used in our industry (see http://blog.unibulmerchantservices.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-credit-card-convenience-fees), which designates a surcharge that merchants offering an “alternate” payment channel (e.g. mail, telephone and e-commerce) are allowed to add to the transaction amount to offset the payment processing cost.  This is why Verizon will not be charging the fee for bank card payments made in person.

    So, even though payment card industry rules define it rather fuzzily, Verizon’s $2 charge is technically legal.  But that doesn’t mean that the carrier’s decision is smart.  On the contrary, it is a real dumb move.  Processing fees are a cost of doing business and should not be passed on to consumers.  If you don’t want to accept credit and debit cards, you don’t have to, but if you decide to be doing it, you should be willing to pay for it.  It is really that simple.

  • Anonymous

    Verizon’s $2 convenience fee has all the potential of backfiring on the scale of BofA’s ill-conceived $5 debit card fee.

    “Convenience fee” happens to be a technical term used in our industry (see http://blog.unibulmerchantservices.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-credit-card-convenience-fees), which designates a surcharge that merchants offering an “alternate” payment channel (e.g. mail, telephone and e-commerce) are allowed to add to the transaction amount to offset the payment processing cost.  This is why Verizon will not be charging the fee for bank card payments made in person.

    So, even though payment card industry rules define it rather fuzzily, Verizon’s $2 charge is technically legal.  But that doesn’t mean that the carrier’s decision is smart.  On the contrary, it is a real dumb move.  Processing fees are a cost of doing business and should not be passed on to consumers.  If you don’t want to accept credit and debit cards, you don’t have to, but if you decide to be doing it, you should be willing to pay for it.  It is really that simple.

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