Google says Nexus Two Android phone not happening

Google-Nexus-One

Apparently, Google will not be releasing the much hoped for Nexus Two, the supposed Super Phone followup to the Nexus One Android phone. Google chief Eric Schmidt essentially confirmed that the search giant has no plans to make or sell the fabled QWERTY keyboard-toting successor to the Nexus One. Google believes that they accomplished their goals and don’t need a Nexus Two Android phone. This is one of the saddest things I’ve ever had to write.

Some will be sad to hear this news, but there are probably more people out there that just don’t care. Some will ask why would Google need to come out with another Android device when their are phones like the Sprint HTC EVO 4G, Verizon Motorola Droid X, and all those Samsung Galaxy S variants? Well, there’s at least one good reason why a Google-branded Android phone with a stock Android homescreen would be preferable. Android OS update cycles.

The three aforementioned phones have one thing in common, and it’s that they all have their own custom skin. This slows down updates, and one of the biggest appeals to the Nexus One was that you would have no doubt that the newest software would hit it before anything else – not having to port a custom homescreen UI to every new software update means shorter wait times for updates. The Nexus One uses an untouched version of Android OS, and no other Android phone can claim that.

Some will argue that the Motorola Droid was exactly the same. That’s both right and wrong. The closest device as far as a purely stock Android device would definitely be the Droid, but it’s under Verizon’s rule. Verizon will add it’s VCAST apps into the device, as well as add their own dedicated tab in the Android Market. Oh, and that free WiFi hotspot feature the Nexus One sports on Android 2.2 Froyo OS? Try finding that on the Motorola Droid, it’s not going to happen. As little of a footprint Google’s online store put onto the mobile world, it was still a good idea. Unfortunately, it just was not executed very well. Google should have allowed their device into carriers’ stores, as well as sell it online. Some may think that that way of doing things would be needless, but it worked enough for me, and I’d still take my Nexus One over any smartphone today.

Here’s what Mr. Eric Schmidt had to say:

The idea a year and a half ago was to do the Nexus One to try to move the phone platform hardware business forward. It clearly did. It was so successful, we didn’t have to do a second one. We would view that as positive but people criticized us heavily for that. I called up the board and said: ‘Ok, it worked. Congratulations – we’re stopping’. We like that flexibility, we think that flexibility is characteristic of nimbleness at our scale.

Frankly, I’m kind of pissed. Yes I’ll get over it, but I was really looking forward to seeing a Nexus Two. If you’ve read anything I’ve written.. I just couldn’t shut up about it the near-mythical phone. If there’s one thing I ask of Android smartphone manufactures, create at least one phone with a pristine Android experience. Make more stock Android devices, damnit.

[Via: Telegraph.co.uk]

  • Michael_Martin

    Thats one of the mains points with the next Android release later this year, Gingerbread, is to make these custom UIs rendered moot so all the phones essentially fork back to the stock Android.

    Having the former head of WebOS UI hopefully will go a long way towards this universal interface.

  • Bogart

    This is indeed a sad news. :(
    Well, that's how it goes. Google, you suck! But nonetheless, you still rock most of the time.

  • jerry

    I basically agree with everything you say Blake — I like having a Nexus unencumbered with carrier's crap and restrictions. I'm on AT&T and am enjoying free wifi tethering.

    But I do think, at least for now, that the Nexus Two would not bring very much else that was innovative to the market.

    Or rather, what I think is that Google failed the Nexus One, and failed their own desires to change how consumers purchase phones with the egregious oversight that required different Nexus Ones for T-Mobile and AT&T.

    Let's face it, the Nexus One is still tied to the carrier, even though it seemed to be Google's preference that it would not be.

    An innovative Nexus Two might not have a keyboard — it would definitely support T-Mobile and AT&T at the same time with the same SKU with the same physical device with perhaps only the swapping of a SIM card.

  • will williams

    I’m with you on that… I would not trade my nexus one for any other smart phone out there. …
    . I love the nexus one and I just don’t understand why people give bad reviews about it…. nexus one is a great smart phone and it represent android the way google design it….. 100% android! People talk about Verizon’s Droid that its better than N1, NOOO IT WAS JUST BETTER ADVERTISE THATS ALL….. but anyways I’m happy with my N1 and to me is the best smart phone…….. Oh and before I forget…….. it gets android OS update faster and most of all 1st…

  • will williams

    I’m with you on that… I would not trade my nexus one for any other smart phone out there. …. I love the nexus one and I just don’t understand why people give bad reviews about it…. nexus on a great smart phone and it represent android the about Verizon’s Droid that its better than N1, NOO IT WAS JUST BETTER ADVERTISE THATS ALL….. but smart phone…….. Oh and before I forget…….. it ge android OS update faster and most of all 1st…

  • smokes

    its actually good.. N1 is quite awesome and doesnt need an update.i mean another nexux 2..

  • RParr

    I believe the best way to avoid the fragmentation and the update delays is for their to exist a "pure Android" alternative. An Android reference platform, if you will. If Nexus Xxx is available and showcases what the latest, greatest Android can do, carriers will be forced to keep up. Even if Google opts not to develop or market a Nexus Xxx, I strongly believe they should make certain there is at least one designated "pure Android" phone available; preferably with unadulterated service available from more than one carrier.

  • lewiiis

    Gutted about this and I totally agree about the N1. All of the bad reviews were based on the 2.0 version but on 2.2 it’s a completely different proposition. That’s the benefit: frequent updates weeks after new functionality is announced.
    As a UK user the Google store will be sadly missed too. Online suppliers here just stuck £200 on top of the price direct from Google. It’s frustrating to hear both the phone and store being killed off for getting stick over what, for me, has been easily the best mobile experience I’ve had.

Back to top ▴