iPhone loyalty at 89%, competition not so much

Apple iPhone Loyalty 89%

It’s no surprise that Apple has a large loyal following, something other companies probably cry themselves to sleep at night over. But just how large and loyal is this following? Statistics for the iPhone are in, and they’re huge as always. It turns out Apple has an astounding 89 percent retention rate, according to a survey conducted by UBS Investment Research. That means for every 100 people who buy an iPhone, 89 of those people plan on buying another one in the future.

While Apple is feeling the love, competition is having a tougher time convincing consumers they’re the best of the best. Next in line for loyalty is HTC with a 39 percent retention rate — a 50 percent difference, and for second best, that number isn’t even slightly impressive. After HTC comes RIM’s 33 percent retention rate. The BlackBerry-maker is in third place, yes, but that number is down from 62 percent just 18 months ago. This is the biggest drop in loyalty out of all the handset manufacturers. RIM just can’t catch a break. The final three companies that made the list are Samsung, Motorola, and Nokia. Each have 28 percent, 25 percent, and 24 percent retention rates respectively.

Now let’s talk some software. Android has a 55 percent retention rate, which is a significant improvement over the individual manufacturers. However, out of the 45 percent of unhappy customers, 31 percent plan on switching to an iPhone for their next device. So Apple is not only taking in a gigantic amount of current iPhone users, but also a generous amount of new iPhone users as well. The iPhone 5 is going to break a lot of records. And hearts.

[via AppleInsider]

  • Lord Emu

    Don’t think it’s out of ‘loyalty’ – that’s a very generous interpretation unless that term was specifically surveyed. It’s just the phone that requires the least tech-IQ to work (combined with its obvious qualities), and it has a specific style of software so switching to another phone whether Android, Windows or Nokia would present a challenge of some sorts to most Apple users. I think Sony’s Xperia range of phones this year are worthy of consideration as iPhone alternatives and hopefully Nokia’s new partnership with Microsoft will soon be contributing to the competition. And Samsung has its fans among techies.

  • Lord Emu

    Don’t think it’s out of ‘loyalty’ – that’s a very generous interpretation unless that term was specifically surveyed. It’s just the phone that requires the least tech-IQ to work (combined with its obvious qualities), and it has a specific style of software so switching to another phone whether Android, Windows or Nokia would present a challenge of some sorts to most Apple users. I think Sony’s Xperia range of phones this year are worthy of consideration as iPhone alternatives and hopefully Nokia’s new partnership with Microsoft will soon be contributing to the competition. And Samsung has its fans among techies.

  • Anonymous

    Apple has the most fanbois. not really news, is it?

    • Anonymous

      I guess you’re the exception of that rule.

  • Anonymous

    Since this survey appears not to be all that public (The source link has no source other than the name of the bank that did the survey), I find it a bit hard to take this sort of surveys seriously.

    No doubt Apple has a abnormally high retention rate, but usually the question they ask in these surveys is something along the line of “which device do you have now?” and “would you buy the same brand for your next upgrade?”.
    Apple has a very appealing product, but it also has a very steep price point. So what people respond to as being what they -want- for their next device could very well be that they forget to factor in that they might not have the cash to get it.

    With the amount of Android users who wants to change to iPhone and the high amount of iPhone users that will upgrade to the next model, iPhone should have close to 80% market share by now. In reality they are not even near 50%.

    It will be more interesting to find out what that iPhone 4S is all about. Since Apple needs a lower priced alternative to grab more market share from the competition.

  • Vashthep

    If this measured the operating system of the phone rather than the manufacturer, this would tell a very different tale.

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