Motorola: we’re going to stay the same after acquisition – but why?

googorola

As we all await Google’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola to close, Motorola remains stern on the belief that nothing will change on its product strategy for the forseeable future. Well, in an interview conducted by FierceWireless, Alain Mutricy, Motorola’s senior vice president of portfolio and product management uttered those same sentiments.

In the interview, the Moto exec went on to say the same old jazz we’ve all come accustomed to when both companies discuss life after the acquisition closes, such as, “Motorola will continue as a separate brand and a subsidiary of Google,” he said “I don’t see a very short-term, complete change of the product direction.” Also adding “I think that we have a business to run, and I think that there is continuity to be expected for 2012.”

Some other noteworthy comments the Motorola exec mentioned was “how it’s in the company’s interest to keep Android open.” When it comes to collaborating on the software side of things, he believes the company can capitalize on Google’s popular social sites: Google+ and YouTube. Another interesting tidbit Mutricy spoke on was the company’s commitment to slow down production of devices, being “mindful on the frequency of product replacement.” In laymen terms, it’s like him saying: we finally understand the difference between consumer demand and making stuff just to make it.

That said, I don’t understand why Motorola and Google continue to play this unnecessary game when it comes to them merging together, as both companies treat each other like each side has the cooties. A lot of Android evangelist scoffed at HP CEO Meg Whitman, when she said Motorola-Google deal will end Android’s open source nature. Okay, her comments may have been grossly exaggerated, but if you look at the deal as a whole there’s some real improvement that can be made if Google prioritizes Motorola.

Just think, every OEM on the planet gets a version of Android and tweak it to their own satisfaction already, so if Google wanted to make all Nexus devices under Motorola it shouldn’t be a problem. This would be a super easy way to solve the search giant’s fragmentation issues, as it would effectively take a bit of power away from the wireless cell providers — who get to control when or if certain handsets receive updates. A union between hardware and software under the same tent is beautiful.

If Google were to favor Motorola would it effect other OEMs?

[via FierceWireless]

 

 

 

 

  • C Macartney

    As long as Motoblur goes away a lot of us will be happy, and while they’re at it why not use a vanilla Android OS/ROM? Things will definitely change, no doubt.

  • C Macartney

    As long as Motoblur goes away a lot of us will be happy, and while they’re at it why not use a vanilla Android OS/ROM? Things will definitely change, no doubt.

  • http://www.techendeavour.com/Mobile_Application_Development Mobile application development

    The merger should result in innovation in the mobile industry. The hardware manufacturer can pump out devices that will be backed by Android without any patent infringements. This acquisition will make way for manufacturing great devices.

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